spam musubi

One of my favorite ways to eat spam is in spam musubi; a Hawaiian dish which is basically a block of gorgeously fried spam pressed on or in between rice and then wrapped with a strip of seaweed. No, I do not know what spam is – and I do not want to know because this treat is wayyy too delicious to give up! Feel free to add additional ingredients to customize your musubi. As you can see in the picture below, I’ve added some eggs into the mix, along with a sprinkling of Bubu Arare (Rice Crackers) for crunch and a line of Kewpie Mayonnaise because I can, because I wanted to, but mainly because it just takes the musubi to a whole another level!

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Ingredients:

  • sushi rice
  • spam
  • seaweed
  • scrambled egg (optional)
  • bubu arare (optional)
  • kewpie mayo (optional)

Directions:

  1. First you make a batch of sushi rice following this sushi rice recipe.
  2. While the rice is cooking up, remove the block of spam from the container (this might require a ton of banging) and then cut them into 1/4 inch slabs. Fry these slices of spam in a flat stovetop pan until they are seared and crispy on both sides.
  3. When both the spam and the rice are ready, scoop enough rice to cover half of the seaweed (or all of it!) and place the spam on top of the rice. Layer on any additional optional toppings you desire.
  4. To finish, roll the spam in a similar fashion as you would following these sushi rolling tips and seal with rice. Easy and yummy!

musubi

 

 

 

 

 

pan-seared salmon w/ sautéed hericots verts & garlic

This simple lunch (or dinner!) will take you less than 30 minutes to put together. For the salmon, follow this pan-seared salmon recipe to get the salmon going while you cook up the hericots verts following the recipe below.

salmon greens

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ceviche charred corn & plantain chips

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As soon as I tried this ceviche charred corn and plantain chips combo at the ICC open-house, I knew I had to try out their recipe at home someday! And today is the day. Continue reading for the full recipe. One note, fluke and flounder are the same exact fish – it’s just called fluke during the summer seasons and flounder during the winter seasons.

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